Art, Book, & Paper Restoration
Kelsey Conservation
Atlanta, Georgia
Atlanta Art Restoration
Kelsey Conservation serves Atlanta, Georgia & the surrounding area and stands as a beacon of excellence in the realms of art and paper restoration and conservation.

With a team of highly skilled conservators, this company dedicates itself to preserving the artistic and historical integrity of various artworks and documents.

Kelsey Conservation is renowned for its meticulous attention to detail, use of cutting-edge technology, and commitment to maintaining the original essence of each piece.

We proudly serve individuals, museums, and other institutional clients.

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Atlanta Art Restoration

Restore the Beauty of Your Masterpiece

Restore, Conserve, Cherish | Art Conservation At Its Finest

1

Stained Artwork

Our skilled conservators remove distracting discoloration and staining to reveal your work of art’s true beauty.

2

Damaging Tapes

Removal of yellowing and discolored tapes, and reduction of adhesive residues.

3

Paper Creases & Tears

Folds and creases in the paper substrate are reduced, and tears are stabilized with archival mending tissues.

4

Paper Acidity

Your work of art on paper is washed to remove acidity and treated to provide an alkaline reserve, so it can be appreciated for generations.

5

Media Loss

Abrasions and losses to imagery are infilled and inpainted to blend naturally with surrounding media.

6

Acidic Backing Boards

Damaging acidic backings are removed from your work of art on paper.

What Sets Us Apart

Atlanta Art Restoration
No project is too small or too large.
We tap into our network of conservators to restore extremely delicate or highly valued items.

1

Excellence

Our conservators possess a wide array of knowledge and skills treating paper and vellum-based artifacts.

2

Expertise

Continuing education and training are a high priority at Kelsey Conservation, and our experienced staff attend seminars and workshops on an ongoing basis to stay up-to-date with the best practices in the conservation sciences.

3

Quality

4

Service

Browse through the endorsements from those we've had the privilege to serve, illustrating our firm commitment to prioritize their goals, and our relentless pursuit to provide exceptional customer experiences, a core principle of our business philosophy.

From fragile to

forever!

Fine Art Repair & Restoration

At Kelsey Conservation, we specialize in the delicate art of fine art repair and restoration. Our skilled artisans use a blend of traditional techniques and modern technology to restore your beloved artworks to their original glory.

  • Expertise in Diverse Mediums: Whether it’s a hand drawn sketch, a delicate watercolor, or a unique work of art on paper, our team of experienced conservators handles all mediums with the utmost care.
  • State-of-the-Art Techniques: Utilizing the latest in applied scientific conservation practices, we ensure your artwork is not only restored but also preserved for future generations.
  • Customized Care: Each piece of artwork is unique, and so is our approach. 
    We provide personalized consultations to ensure we understand your specific needs.
Tape Removal
Tape Stain Reduction

Tapes are often applied with the best intentions to stabilize tears or prepare artwork for display, but as time goes by, they deteriorate and begin to damage the paper and art media.

Tape also comes in many varieties and vintages. These include Scotch tape, invisible tape, kraft paper tape, linen tape, masking tape, duct tape, and many others.

We analyze each type of tape adhered to artifacts that arrive in our conservation lab. Adhesive formulations vary widely and require individualized and targeted approaches for optimal treatment results.

Removal of Damaging Tape

Our skilled conservators carefully remove tapes and distracting stains from your work of art, so its beauty can once again be appreciated.

Mending & Infilling
Tears & Losses

Tears in the paper substrate are stabilized and mended with conservation grade tissues, and holes and losses infilled with Asian & European papers to blend sympathetically.

Mending Tears

Mending tears in artworks is a delicate process, involving the use of specific techniques and materials that align with the original artwork.

Infilling Losses

Infilling, or filling in the missing pieces of an artwork, requires a keen eye for detail and a thorough understanding of the original material.

Ethical Considerations

Restoration is not just about repairing; it's about preserving the integrity and intent of the original artist.

Advanced Techniques

The field of art restoration is constantly evolving, with new technologies and digital techniques enhancing the ability to restore artworks accurately.

snipe-before-pic snipe-after-pic
Washing & Stain Reduction​

We offer washing and removal of distracting stains from works of art on paper, including reduction of foxing & matburn removal, as well as removal of overall yellowing and discoloration due to light exposure and other environmental factors.

art-stain-before art-stain-after
Before
After

Identifying Stains

Stains on artwork can range from dust and grime to more severe issues like mold or chemical reactions. It's essential to identify the type of stain and its severity to determine the appropriate approaches to remove stains.

Materials & Tools

Using the right materials is critical. Gentle, pH-neutral solutions and soft tools like sponges or cotton swabs are usually gentle enough to do the job right. It's important to avoid harsh chemicals that can cause irreversible damage to your artwork.

Quality Assurance

We offer conservation treatments for items of either rare or sentimental value, including:  works of art on paper, manuscripts, birth certificates, diplomas, books and photographs.

For customers within driving distance, we offer estimates from our Greensboro studio. You are also welcome to make arrangements to mail your item(s) to us for a quote. We periodically make trips to East Coast & Southeastern cities including Atlanta, Birmingham, Washington DC, Richmond, Charlottesville, Nashville, Chattanooga and Knoxville to provide consultations for customers residing in those regions. Please fill out the free quote request form, or call our studio to speak with us in person. We look forward to helping you preserve your precious artifacts.

Marianne Kelsey

Marianne Kelsey
Director & Senior Conservator

Backing Removal

Many times works of art are adhered to acidic backing boards that are slowly damaging the work of art over time.  The backing boards may be mounted in their entirety with adhesives or attached with tapes along the edges.

Initial Assessment

The nature of the materials used to adhere the backing board to your work of art will be evaluated and tested to determine the safest and most effective approach to remove the backing board.

Tools & Materials

Embarking on a backing removal journey requires an arsenal of specialized tools, from microspatulas to moisture-controlled environments, ensuring the artwork's safety throughout the process.

Safe Removal

From dry methods involving gentle peeling to more complex wet techniques that soften adhesives, the removal process is an art unto itself.

Fragile Works

Older or more delicate artworks require an extra degree of care, often necessitating creative solutions to prevent damage during the removal process.

Inpainting
Media Losses

Our conservators inpaint a variety of media losses, including charcoal drawings, lithographs, aquatint, mezzotint, chalk pastel drawings, watercolor & gouache paintings, pencil sketches and more. Areas of loss are inpainted with artist grade materials to blend as sympathetically as possible with the surrounding imagery.

Assessment

Inpainting, the process of retouching a painting to cover up damaged or missing areas, can sometimes obscure the original artwork. Understanding inpainting involves not just a look at its composition but also familiarity with the techniques involved in removing unwanted inpainting.

Media Losses

Artworks can suffer from various types of losses, including fading, chipping, and tearing. Identifying types of losses is the first step in the restoration process, followed by strategizing the most effective methods for repairing damages.

Removing Inpainting

Art restoration extends beyond paintings to include sculptures, frescoes, and historical manuscripts. Each art form presents unique challenges in removing inpainting and requires specialized techniques to achieve the best results. This section provides insights into the tailored approaches for various mediums used for works of art on paper.

Materials

The choice of tools and materials can significantly impact the outcome of a restoration project. This aspect contrasts traditional vs. modern tools and highlights the importance of using artist grade preservation materials that ensure the longevity of the restored piece without compromising its original essence.

mending-infilling-pre mending-infilling-post
Before
After
Flattening &
Removal of Acidity

Over time, works of art can suffer creases, cockling, and planar distortion due to uneven attachment to backing boards, and other types of surface distortion. They can also become acidic and embrittled due to age or exposure to environmental pollutants. We will humidify, flatten, and reduce creases to your works of art, as well as treat the paper to reduce its acidity.

Acidity Removal
Professional acidity removal involves a series of steps tailored to the artwork's specific needs, ensuring the preservation of its original qualities while extending its lifespan.
Flattening
The conservation flattening process is meticulously planned and executed, utilizing specialized equipment and techniques to ensure the artwork's safety and integrity.

Common Restoration Fixes

Stains
Tape Removal
Backing Removal
Mending & Infilling

Washing & Stain Reduction

Removal of distracting stains from works of art on paper, including reduction of foxing & matburn, as well as removal of overall yellowing and discoloration.

Tape Removal

Removal of damaging tapes and the associated residues. Once disfiguring tapes and associated staining are removed, your artwork can once again be fully appreciated.

Backing Removal

Works of art on paper attached to backing boards can cause damage to the artwork itself. We remove acidic backing boards from works of art to preserve them for eternity.

Mending & Infilling Tears & Losses

Tears in the paper substrate are stabilized and mended with conservation grade tissues, and holes and losses infilled with Asian & European papers to blend sympathetically.

Art Restoration & Conservation Services

Founder and CEO Marianne Kelsey has been involved in art and paper conservation for over 20 years. 

Her wide range of experience working in a variety of institutional and private practice settings has provided her with a depth of knowledge in her field. 

Marianne is a peer reviewed Professional Associate of the American Institute for Conservation of Historic and Artistic Works.

Customer Reviews

200+

Clients Already Served

The Art of Restoration: Navigating Complexities in Fine Art Conservation

The restoration of works of art on paper involves meticulous processes that breathe new life into damaged works of art, preserving cultural artifacts for future generations. In this article, we delve into common conservation challenges, including repairing tears and losses, tape damage, artwork backing removal, inpainting media losses, and addressing planar distortion and cockling of the paper substrate, as well as reduction of paper acidity.

Sharing our expert insights, in this article we will illuminate the intricate and often multilayered treatment techniques and considerations that ensure the longevity and integrity of treasured artworks.

Q: What are the primary challenges in repairing tears and losses in artwork?

A: The main challenge lies in seamlessly mending the tear without compromising the original integrity and aesthetic of the artwork. This involves carefully aligning the torn paper edges, choosing the appropriate adhesive, and applying it with care to ensure the repair is not noticeable to the naked eye. The type of media and the age of the artwork also play crucial roles in determining the appropriate conservation treatment techniques.

Q: How do conservators address these challenges?

A: Conservators use various techniques such as lining, where a supportive archival backing is added to reinforce the original paper, or infilling, where a piece of archival sympathetically toned paper is used to fill in a loss in the paper substrate. Conservators also employ reversible adhesives to ensure that if for any reason a repair needs to be removed many years from now, a future generation of conservators will be able to do so without harming the work of art.

Kelsey Conservation, Atlanta, Georgia

Q: What issues does tape pose to artworks?

A: Tape can cause discoloration, staining, and become permanently attached to the paper substrate of your work of art over time, causing permanent damage if it is removed incorrectly.  Over time, the adhesives in most pressure-sensitive tapes will degrade and often discolor.  This is particularly evident with some of the older variations of Scotch tape that used rosin in their adhesive formulations.  As the tape ages, it begins to cross-link with the cellulose molecules, eventually becoming permanently married to the paper itself. 

Q: What techniques are used to mitigate tape damage?

A: There are two components to tape, the carrier and the adhesive attached to it.  The carrier in essence serves as a vehicle for the tape, but it also creates a cohesive unit that will hold together and lend some strength to any tape repairs that have been performed.  Tape carriers can be comprised of plastic as well as linen. Conservators often remove the carrier mechanically, but frequently solvents are necessary as well.  We also use solvents to gently dissolve the adhesives. This process requires a thorough understanding of the complex chemistry involved and a delicate, experienced touch to prevent solvent penetration that could harm the artwork further.

Kelsey Conservation, Atlanta, Georgia

Q: Why is the removal of artwork backing necessary?

A: Backings, often made from acidic materials, can cause deterioration over time. Works of art on paper are often adhered to backing boards in preparation for framing and display.  Backing materials commonly used include a variety of boards and even sheets of wood.  Whether the boards used were archival to begin with or not, over time as they age, they will become acidic.  Wood is by its very nature acidic to begin with.  As the backing ages, the acidic compounds in the backing will migrate into the work of art, often causing staining and discoloration.  The removal of acidic backing attachments is essential for almost any effective & thorough conservation treatment.  Removal of the backing will allow the work of art to be washed and treated to reduce stains, as well as treated to reduce acidity and provide an alkaline buffer. 

Q: How is a backing removed safely?

A: The process of backing removal can involve carefully detaching the backing material mechanically, often layer by layer, to avoid damaging the artwork. It can also involve immersion in a targeted solution of solvents that will allow it to release successfully from the work of art.  Any backing removal treatment must be performed with great care, and always under the watchful eye of a skilled conservator.

Kelsey Conservation, Atlanta, Georgia

Q: What is inpainting, and when is this technique used?

A: Inpainting is the process of retouching areas of a work of art on paper that have lost media, such as pastels, watercolors, gouache, or lithographic inks.  The intention of the inpainting process is to restore the original appearance of the artwork, allowing areas of damage or loss to blend sympathetically with surrounding imagery.  The inpainting treatment is performed after stabilizing the artwork and infilling any losses to the paper support, thus ensuring a stable surface.

Q: How do conservators ensure inpainting remains true to the original?

A: Conservators use artist grade pigments and materials, closely matching the original artist’s technique and color palette. This meticulous process ensures that the inpainting is virtually undetectable and blends well with the original media.

Kelsey Conservation, Atlanta, Georgia

Q: Why is flattening and acidity reduction important for works of art on paper?

A: Over time, paper-based artworks can become cockled and distorted due to fluctuations in temperature and humidity in their environment, while acidity from poor quality framing materials can cause yellowing and embrittlement.

Q: How are these issues addressed?

A: Flattening involves carefully humidifying and then pressing the artwork under controlled conditions to remove planar distortions. Acidity reduction involves deacidification processes that neutralize acids and add a protective alkaline reserve to the paper, extending the artwork’s lifespan.

In conclusion, artwork restoration is a delicate balance of art and science, requiring a deep understanding of materials, techniques, and the original artist’s intent. Through these specialized restoration treatment approaches, conservators ensure that works of art can continue to tell their stories and enrich our cultural landscape for generations to come.

Kelsey Conservation, Atlanta, Georgia

Restore the Beauty of
Your Masterpiece

Restore, Conserve, Cherish

Art Conservation At Its Finest

1

Stained Artwork

Our skilled conservators remove distracting discoloration and staining to reveal your work of art’s true beauty.

2

Damaging Tapes

Removal of yellowing and discolored tapes, and reduction of adhesive residues.

3

Paper Creases & Tears

Folds and creases in the paper substrate are reduced, and tears are stabilized with archival mending tissues.

4

Paper Acidity

Your work of art on paper is washed to remove acidity and treated to provide an alkaline reserve, so it can be appreciated for generations.

5

Media Loss

Abrasions and losses to imagery are infilled and inpainted to blend naturally with surrounding media.

6

Acidic Backing Boards

Damaging acidic backings are removed from your work of art on paper.

What Sets Us Apart

No project is too small or too large.
We tap into our network of conservators to restore extremely delicate or highly valued items.

1

Excellence

Our conservators possess a wide array of knowledge and skills treating paper and vellum-based artifacts.

2

Expertise

Continuing education and training are a high priority at Kelsey Conservation, and our experienced staff attend seminars and workshops on an ongoing basis to stay up-to-date with the best practices in the conservation sciences.

3

Quality

4

Service

Browse through the endorsements from those we've had the privilege to serve, illustrating our firm commitment to prioritize their goals, and our relentless pursuit to provide exceptional customer experiences, a core principle of our business philosophy.

From fragile to

Forever!

Tape Removal
Tape Stain Reduction

Tapes are often applied with the best intentions to stabilize tears or prepare artwork for display, but as time goes by, they deteriorate and begin to damage the paper and art media.

Tape also comes in many varieties and vintages. These include Scotch tape, invisible tape, kraft paper tape, linen tape, masking tape, duct tape, and many others.

We analyze each type of tape adhered to artifacts that arrive in our conservation lab. Adhesive formulations vary widely and require individualized and targeted approaches for optimal treatment results.

Removal of Damaging Tape

Our skilled conservators carefully remove tapes and distracting stains from your work of art, so its beauty can once again be appreciated.

Mending & Infilling
Tears & Losses

Tears in the paper substrate are stabilized and mended with conservation grade tissues, and holes and losses infilled with Asian & European papers to blend sympathetically.

Mending Tears

Mending tears in artworks is a delicate process, involving the use of specific techniques and materials that align with the original artwork.

Infilling Losses

Infilling, or filling in the missing pieces of an artwork, requires a keen eye for detail and a thorough understanding of the original material.

snipe-before-pic snipe-after-pic
Before
After

Ethical Considerations

Restoration is not just about repairing; it's about preserving the integrity and intent of the original artist.

Advanced Techniques

The field of art restoration is constantly evolving, with new technologies and digital techniques enhancing the ability to restore artworks accurately.

Washing & Stain Reduction​

We offer washing and removal of distracting stains from works of art on paper, including reduction of foxing & matburn removal, as well as removal of overall yellowing and discoloration due to light exposure and other environmental factors.

art-stain-before art-stain-after
Before
After

Identifying Stains

Stains on artwork can range from dust and grime to more severe issues like mold or chemical reactions. It's essential to identify the type of stain and its severity to determine the appropriate approaches to remove stains.

Materials & Tools

Using the right materials is critical. Gentle, pH-neutral solutions and soft tools like sponges or cotton swabs are usually gentle enough to do the job right. It's important to avoid harsh chemicals that can cause irreversible damage to your artwork.

Quality Assurance

We offer conservation treatments for items of either rare or sentimental value, including:  works of art on paper, manuscripts, birth certificates, diplomas, books and photographs.

For customers within driving distance, we offer estimates from our Greensboro studio. You are also welcome to make arrangements to mail your item(s) to us for a quote. We periodically make trips to East Coast & Southeastern cities including Atlanta, Birmingham, Washington DC, Richmond, Charlottesville, Nashville, Chattanooga and Knoxville to provide consultations for customers residing in those regions. Please fill out the free quote request form, or call our studio to speak with us in person. We look forward to helping you preserve your precious artifacts.

Marianne Kelsey

Marianne Kelsey
Director & Senior Conservator

Backing
Removal

Many times works of art are adhered to acidic backing boards that are slowly damaging the work of art over time.  The backing boards may be mounted in their entirety with adhesives or attached with tapes along the edges.

Initial Assessment

The nature of the materials used to adhere the backing board to your work of art will be evaluated and tested to determine the safest and most effective approach to remove the backing board.

Tools & Materials

Embarking on a backing removal journey requires an arsenal of specialized tools, from microspatulas to moisture-controlled environments, ensuring the artwork's safety throughout the process.

Safe Removal

From dry methods involving gentle peeling to more complex wet techniques that soften adhesives, the removal process is an art unto itself.

Fragile Works

Older or more delicate artworks require an extra degree of care, often necessitating creative solutions to prevent damage during the removal process.

Inpainting
Media Losses

Our conservators inpaint a variety of media losses, including charcoal drawings, lithographs, aquatint, mezzotint, chalk pastel drawings, watercolor & gouache paintings, pencil sketches and more. Areas of loss are inpainted with artist grade materials to blend as sympathetically as possible with the surrounding imagery.

Assessment

Inpainting, the process of retouching a painting to cover up damaged or missing areas, can sometimes obscure the original artwork. Understanding inpainting involves not just a look at its composition but also familiarity with the techniques involved in removing unwanted inpainting.

Media Losses

Artworks can suffer from various types of losses, including fading, chipping, and tearing. Identifying types of losses is the first step in the restoration process, followed by strategizing the most effective methods for repairing damages.

mending-infilling-pre mending-infilling-post
Before
After

Removing Inpainting

Art restoration extends beyond paintings to include sculptures, frescoes, and historical manuscripts. Each art form presents unique challenges in removing inpainting and requires specialized techniques to achieve the best results. This section provides insights into the tailored approaches for various mediums used for works of art on paper.

Materials

The choice of tools and materials can significantly impact the outcome of a restoration project. This aspect contrasts traditional vs. modern tools and highlights the importance of using artist grade preservation materials that ensure the longevity of the restored piece without compromising its original essence.

Flattening &
Removal of Acidity

Over time, works of art can suffer creases, cockling, and planar distortion due to uneven attachment to backing boards, and other types of surface distortion. They can also become acidic and embrittled due to age or exposure to environmental pollutants. We will humidify, flatten, and reduce creases to your works of art, as well as treat the paper to reduce its acidity.

Acidity Removal
Professional acidity removal involves a series of steps tailored to the artwork's specific needs, ensuring the preservation of its original qualities while extending its lifespan.
Flattening
The conservation flattening process is meticulously planned and executed, utilizing specialized equipment and techniques to ensure the artwork's safety and integrity.

Art Restoration & Conservation Services

Founder and CEO Marianne Kelsey has been involved in art and paper conservation for over 20 years. 

Her wide range of experience working in a variety of institutional and private practice settings has provided her with a depth of knowledge in her field. 

Marianne is a peer reviewed Professional Associate of the American Institute for Conservation of Historic and Artistic Works.

The Art of Restoration: Navigating Complexities in Fine Art Conservation

The restoration of works of art on paper involves meticulous processes that breathe new life into damaged works of art, preserving cultural artifacts for future generations. In this article, we delve into common conservation challenges, including repairing tears and losses, tape damage, artwork backing removal, inpainting media losses, and addressing planar distortion and cockling of the paper substrate, as well as reduction of paper acidity.

Sharing our expert insights, in this article we will illuminate the intricate and often multilayered treatment techniques and considerations that ensure the longevity and integrity of treasured artworks.

Q: What are the primary challenges in repairing tears and losses in artwork?

A: The main challenge lies in seamlessly mending the tear without compromising the original integrity and aesthetic of the artwork. This involves carefully aligning the torn paper edges, choosing the appropriate adhesive, and applying it with care to ensure the repair is not noticeable to the naked eye. The type of media and the age of the artwork also play crucial roles in determining the appropriate conservation treatment techniques.

Q: How do conservators address these challenges?

A: Conservators use various techniques such as lining, where a supportive archival backing is added to reinforce the original paper, or infilling, where a piece of archival sympathetically toned paper is used to fill in a loss in the paper substrate. Conservators also employ reversible adhesives to ensure that if for any reason a repair needs to be removed many years from now, a future generation of conservators will be able to do so without harming the work of art.

Kelsey Conservation, Atlanta, Georgia

Q: What issues does tape pose to artworks?

A: Tape can cause discoloration, staining, and become permanently attached to the paper substrate of your work of art over time, causing permanent damage if it is removed incorrectly.  Over time, the adhesives in most pressure-sensitive tapes will degrade and often discolor.  This is particularly evident with some of the older variations of Scotch tape that used rosin in their adhesive formulations.  As the tape ages, it begins to cross-link with the cellulose molecules, eventually becoming permanently married to the paper itself. 

Q: What techniques are used to mitigate tape damage?

A: There are two components to tape, the carrier and the adhesive attached to it.  The carrier in essence serves as a vehicle for the tape, but it also creates a cohesive unit that will hold together and lend some strength to any tape repairs that have been performed.  Tape carriers can be comprised of plastic as well as linen. Conservators often remove the carrier mechanically, but frequently solvents are necessary as well.  We also use solvents to gently dissolve the adhesives. This process requires a thorough understanding of the complex chemistry involved and a delicate, experienced touch to prevent solvent penetration that could harm the artwork further.

Kelsey Conservation, Atlanta, Georgia

Q: Why is the removal of artwork backing necessary?

A: Backings, often made from acidic materials, can cause deterioration over time. Works of art on paper are often adhered to backing boards in preparation for framing and display.  Backing materials commonly used include a variety of boards and even sheets of wood.  Whether the boards used were archival to begin with or not, over time as they age, they will become acidic.  Wood is by its very nature acidic to begin with.  As the backing ages, the acidic compounds in the backing will migrate into the work of art, often causing staining and discoloration.  The removal of acidic backing attachments is essential for almost any effective & thorough conservation treatment.  Removal of the backing will allow the work of art to be washed and treated to reduce stains, as well as treated to reduce acidity and provide an alkaline buffer. 

Q: How is a backing removed safely?

A: The process of backing removal can involve carefully detaching the backing material mechanically, often layer by layer, to avoid damaging the artwork. It can also involve immersion in a targeted solution of solvents that will allow it to release successfully from the work of art.  Any backing removal treatment must be performed with great care, and always under the watchful eye of a skilled conservator.

Kelsey Conservation, Atlanta, Georgia

Q: What is inpainting, and when is this technique used?

A: Inpainting is the process of retouching areas of a work of art on paper that have lost media, such as pastels, watercolors, gouache, or lithographic inks.  The intention of the inpainting process is to restore the original appearance of the artwork, allowing areas of damage or loss to blend sympathetically with surrounding imagery.  The inpainting treatment is performed after stabilizing the artwork and infilling any losses to the paper support, thus ensuring a stable surface.

Q: How do conservators ensure inpainting remains true to the original?

A: Conservators use artist grade pigments and materials, closely matching the original artist’s technique and color palette. This meticulous process ensures that the inpainting is virtually undetectable and blends well with the original media.

Kelsey Conservation, Atlanta, Georgia

Q: Why is flattening and acidity reduction important for works of art on paper?

A: Over time, paper-based artworks can become cockled and distorted due to fluctuations in temperature and humidity in their environment, while acidity from poor quality framing materials can cause yellowing and embrittlement.

Q: How are these issues addressed?

A: Flattening involves carefully humidifying and then pressing the artwork under controlled conditions to remove planar distortions. Acidity reduction involves deacidification processes that neutralize acids and add a protective alkaline reserve to the paper, extending the artwork’s lifespan.

In conclusion, artwork restoration is a delicate balance of art and science, requiring a deep understanding of materials, techniques, and the original artist’s intent. Through these specialized restoration treatment approaches, conservators ensure that works of art can continue to tell their stories and enrich our cultural landscape for generations to come.

Kelsey Conservation, Atlanta, Georgia

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Washing & Stain Removal Form
  • Contact Information
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Please provide a few details about your works of art so that we can provide an accurate quote. You are not obligated in any way. All quotes are valid for 30 days.

Please provide a few details about your works of art so that we can provide an accurate quote. You are not obligated in any way. All quotes are valid for 30 days.

Please provide a few details about your works of art so that we can provide an accurate quote. You are not obligated in any way. All quotes are valid for 30 days.

Please provide a few details about your works of art so that we can provide an accurate quote. You are not obligated in any way. All quotes are valid for 30 days.